"Michael Selkirk...introduces a sense of anguish, far beyond loneliness...truly brings the very essence of Dickens’ immortal character to the stage. Bravo!"

"The miserly curmudgeon Ebenezer Scrooge is reprised by Michael Selkirk. He introduces a sense of anguish, far beyond loneliness, into Scrooge’s emotions.  But it is an almost palpable
likability that ultimately triumphs.  He truly brings the very essence of Dickens’ immortal character to the stage. Bravo!"

--Cliff Kasden, Queens Courier

"Selkirk makes the transition believable, the pure joy he receives in abandoning his miserly ways etched clearly on his face."

"Anchoring the production is Michael Selkirk, in his third go-round as the surly antithesis to the holiday season.  With his wide white sideburns, gruff demeanor and booming voice, this is a Scrooge who, at first, seems unlikely to ever change his ways. But (spoiler alert), he does indeed change, and Selkirk makes the transition believable, the pure joy he receives in abandoning his miserly ways etched clearly on his face."

"Michael Selkirk plays their kindly, older father...an authentic and lovable man..."

"Michael Selkirk plays their kindly, older father named Edgar who is trying his best to take care of his girls when his heart is breaking from losing the love of his life. He represents an authentic and lovable man who puts his family first and treasures the meaningful things in life such as having everyone together and building a home that everyone could come back to and enjoy. His dedication and true affection for his late wife are apparent, as he looks back at all she endured in the hospital — still wondering if he did everything he could have — despite being there every single day during that difficult time."

--Courtney Marie, Theatrescene.net

"Selkirk’s Scrooge…is a roller coaster of emotion...a sparkling lead debut..."

Michael Selkirk, who plays Ebenezer Scrooge, has been with the company since its establishment about five years ago. He played a variety of supporting roles including a father, a servant and a duke. ‘A Christmas Carol’ has been his first lead for the company, and what a sparkling lead debut it was. 

-- Jennifer Khedaroo, Queens Ledger

"Michael Selkirk as Fezziwig and the Ghost of Christmas Present is a boisterous and joyous presence..."

"Special praise must be given to the actors, among whom there are many standouts. Kevin Loomis as Scrooge is a powerful actor, who masters both the villainy of his character and the humor with first rate craftsmanship. Michael Selkirk as Fezziwig and the Ghost of Christmas Present is a boisterous and joyous presence, and Wilmari Myburgh who plays his wife, among other roles, brings the house to gales of laughter with her over-the-top good cheer."

Georgina Young-Ellis, Queens Gazette

"Selkirk succeeds in creating two distinct characters who celebrate a love of life and mankind."

"Fezziwig and the Ghost of Christmas Present, here both are played by Michael Selkirk, usually provide some comic relief, but Selkirk succeeds in creating two distinct characters who celebrate a love of life and mankind. Fezziwig, who was Scrooge’s first boss, should have been a role model to the young businessman, but instead became for him a cautionary tale of what happens when you do not keep your eye on the bottom line."

Kevin Zimmerman, Queens Times-Ledger

"Particularly memorable are Michael Selkirk as the robust and genial Ghost of Christmas Present..."

"Particularly memorable are Michael Selkirk as the robust and genial Ghost of Christmas Present, Andy Baleschwiler as both a menacing Marley and an ominously silent Ghost of Christmas Future, and Wilmari Myburgh, amusing as Scrooge’s servant Mrs. Dilber. Selkirk and Myburgh also appear as the animated and jolly Fezziwigs who lead the dancing at their own Christmas party."

Victor Gluck, Theatrescene.net

"Michael Selkirk provides as many touching moments as he does subtle comic ones as Ed Horowitz..."

"...Laurie Schroeder as ready-to-break at any moment Judy Prescott (she’s got the most to do here and does it with aplomb); Christine Verleny as Joyce Horowitz, at first seemingly so together, even predatory, but then we find as wounded as anyone else; Alyson Lange plays that pretty much one get-under-your-skin note of Stacia Horowitz; Michael Selkirk provides as many touching moments as he does subtle comic ones as Ed Horowitz, probably the wisest character here next to Stacia’s much beleaguered new college boyfriend Simon played by Luke Hofmaier and Greg Oliver Bodine plays a too-assured of himself Dr. Liam Prescott.  As I say they are all wonderful."

Ralph Greco, Short and Sweet NYC

"Michael Selkirk is marvelously deadpan yet animated."

"With a great sense of time and place, Ms. Goldstein has written a highly compelling and very entertaining, well-plotted play that examines the complicated relationships of these couples with believability, drama, and humor,''

"From its complexly comical opening scene to its wistful conclusion, Daughters of The Sexual Revolution is a joyous, insightful and involving work that is perfectly rendered."

Darryl Reilly, Theatrescene.net

"...a first-rate production...a uniformly excellent cast."

"From Frank Langella at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, to Michael Pennington at Theatre for a New Audience to this summer’s planned Central Park production starring John Lithgow, Lear and his off-spring continue to pop up all around town,

Now for its first show as the resident company at Queens Theatre in Flushing Meadows Corona Park, Titan Theatre Co. brings its uniquely fresh take on the classics in a first-rate production that stands alongside those other recent Lears."

Kevin Zimmerman, Queens Times-Ledger

"Everything about this production is a pleasure...strong and committed performances by the entire cast."

"There is not a gimmick to be found in the WorkShop Theater Company’s smart, engaging, and emotionally rewarding production of Shakespeare’s late romance and so-called “problem play,” The Winter’s Tale. Instead, director Ryan Lee and the outstanding company have taken to heart the bard’s own admonition, used in a different context in Hamlet, that 'the play’s the thing.'"

Howard Miller,  Talkin' Broadway